Abercrombie Caves…

Our last day on music tour and we were heading to Abercrombie caves before heading back to Sydney. Besides being a fun activity for everyone to visit these fabulous limestone caves the children were also fortunate to be able to perform a concert inside the caves with it’s amazing sound.

The Abercrombie Caves, contained within the Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve, are a series of limestone arch caves. The caves are renown for their karst qualities, namely the formation that has been eroded by water action that has developed from a sinkhole to become a blind valley.

Abercrombie Caves

NIKON D750 + 24.0-70.0 mm f/2.8 @ 38 mm, 1/40 sec at f/4, ISO 7200

Note: These images (especially the wider shots) look much better when larger – so click any of the images below to see larger versions in an inline overlay slideshow gallery viewer.

The reserve is situated 75 kilometres south of Bathurst, near the small village of Trunkey Creek. The caves are registered as a natural heritage site for its large diversity of karst morphological and sedimentological features.

Abercrombie Caves

NIKON D750 + 24.0-70.0 mm f/2.8 @ 24 mm, 1/25 sec at f/4, ISO 4500

The most popular feature of the Abercrombie Caves is the Hall of Terpsichore also known as The Archway – the largest natural arch in the southern hemisphere. Within The Archway cave is the gold miners dance platform built in January 1880 by gold miners, replacing a platform built in the 1860s, the 1880s platform is still used for performances to this day including the annual Carols in the Caves performance.

It was here the band and strings were allowed to perform and after their concert we were taken on a guided tour down into the caves before being allowed to explore.

Abercrombie Caves

NIKON D750 + 24.0-70.0 mm f/2.8 @ 27 mm, 1/30 sec at f/4, ISO 3600

NIKON D750 + 28.0-300.0 mm f/3.5-5.6 @ 250 mm, 1/250 sec at f/5.6, ISO 800